Remembering 9/11

Twin.Towers_1986Where were you when the world stopped turning?  So says the song by Alan Jackson about the tragedy of September 11, 2001. Even though these events happened 14 years old, I remember that morning as if it was yesterday.

Never before had I felt such chills while watching the news.  Seeing the second airplane fly into the tower was a shock and I instinctively knew something was very wrong.  Little did I or others know that in many ways life would never be the same again. The entire day was then a blur of emotions, sadness, and shock.

I was one of the lucky ones though.  I didn’t know anyone killed in the towers or at the Pentagon, or on the airplane.  I instead mourned for those who did, and held my husband,  family, and friends a little bit tighter.

As a result of this tragedy, we saw the both the best and worst of people.  We also saw a lot of love and appreciation for helping others.  My prayer is that we can remember to help one another, be kind to one another, and continue to love one another.

This photo is one that I posted last year on the anniversary of 9/11.  I took it during one of two chorus trips to New York City in the 1980s.  The first was in the early 1980s and the second trip was in 1986.  Both trips were fantastic.

We saw amazing sights — the United Nations Building, The Statue of Liberty, Macy’s, the Twin Towers, Central Park, and “Cats” on Broadway.  I bought some I Love NY souvenirs and was happy to be there.  It is a great city that I hope to visit again.

I recently read a fascinating book by a man who worked in one of the towers.  He is blind and was there on 9/11 with his guide dog.  They both made it out with several other people from his office and from other offices.  They walked down 1,463 stairs to get out.  At the time, they didn’t know what was happening.  He just knew that they needed to leave the building.

The man’s name is Michael Hingson, the book is “Thunder Dog” and the guide dog was Roselle.  She helped him remain calm enough to keep walking and not panic.  This is an amazing book that I recommend reading.  This experience was part of their story but there has been so much more for both of them since.

And, there has been so much more for all of the survivors.  People continued on with their lives.  This chapter on the stairs mentions a quote from a New York Times editorial from September 12, 2001, “It was one of those moments in which history splits, and we define the world as ‘before’ and ‘after.'”

I hope and pray for those who lived to see after.  May we make the most of our lives and savor each and every moment.  May we appreciate those who worked to protect us and died in the process.  May we appreciate and be thankful for our military who have fought for our nation both before and after.

After all, those who died that day didn’t know it would be their last morning with their families.  May we never take one another for granted.  May we make the most of each and every moment that we are blessed with.  And, may we never forget.

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2 thoughts on “Remembering 9/11

  1. Patti,
    I got teary eyed just reading this post. It brings back all the memories……I agree with “the world before and after”. Scott and I have often had this conversation about how people document their lives by before and after a tragedy. I know on 9/11 I was still grieving the loss of my husband 10 months earlier, and then with the horrific events of 9/11 the awareness of that very idea of “before and after” was so very real to me. I instinctively knew that the American way of life would be forever altered. Time softens the wounds, but there will always be a ragged scar from the wound inflicted on our country that day.

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